Saturday, February 23, 2013

BALLYHOO Magazine Part Two Late 1930s



Halloween Number 1937 ~ the future!

Published in the United States by Dell and created by George Delacorte Jr., Ballyhoo was an unusual magazine filled with humor and satire. It appeared in both American and English editions, often with thematic "special" issues. Because of its general tone of irreverence for the establishment and spoof advertising, Ballyhoo is sometimes credited as being the inspiration for Mad magazine. The early 1930s issues were full size with excellent cover illustrations, many by Russell Patterson. The issues leading up to the WWII era were reduced to digest size (see previous post) with a mix of humor and political satire on the covers. More of the story here.


The Horror Number

Invitation to be a cover girl

The Gang! Note the Look and Life logotypes.


The Cock-Eyed Number

The Jap Number. Cotton stockings ~ Boycott Meets Girl!

Graffitied Ginger Rogers cover
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BALLYHOO Magazine 1930s Humor & Satire


Abstract cover with keyhole die-cut

Published in the United States by Dell and created by George Delacorte Jr., Ballyhoo was an unusual magazine filled with humor and satire. It appeared in both American and English editions, often with thematic "special" issues. Because of its general tone of irreverence for the establishment and spoof advertising, Ballyhoo is sometimes credited as being the inspiration for Mad magazine. The early 1930s issues were full size with excellent cover illustrations, many by Russell Patterson. The issues leading up to the WWII era were reduced to digest size (see next post) with a mix a of humor and political satire on the covers. More of the story here.



Paris Issue

The Lady Godiva Number



The Hangover Number with night/next morning cover by Jack Markow



The Nudist Number

The Repeal (prohibition) Number

The Travel Number

Striking stripper cover

The Xmas Number

The Travel Number

Friday, February 22, 2013

LONDON LIFE Magazine 1930s



Prior to ever owning or even having seen a single copy of London Life the appeal of the magazine loomed large. Soon after entering the trade I met a few "serious" dealers and collectors who were sometimes overenthusiastic for books or magazines that they had very little, if any experience with. People spoke of London Life in legendary terms of its importance and influence.  My first question was "have you ever held it in your hands?" ...responding "Never seen it" is not the correct answer when evaluating the importance of anything! After some years of searching, one thing was certain, London Life was one of the "rare birds" in my area of specialty. 

Most of the stories about this large format magazine, especially the issues from the 1930s, did not directly involve its contents, but the influence it had on John Willie. I was finally able to judge for myself, when about twenty years ago, I bought about 100 issues at a paper show. All from the 1930s, in great condition and with wonderful covers. However after studying them over and over, the most I could find were a few photographs in one issue (see my John Willie post) and letters from readers and columns devoted to lingerie, corsets and boots. 


What London Life did turn out to be was a very good pop culture magazine with a special interest in American movies and movie stars as well as all other forms of popular entertainments plus occasional nudes and risque photographs. 

I sat on that stack of London Life for quite a few years until a collector insisted that they be part of the payment for the purchase of a significant part of his photographs collection. I was happy to oblige and the deal was done. Sadly, I made only these few scans prior to them going to their new home. 



















John Willie's BIZARRE 1940s ~ 1950s



A miscellaneous harvest from my archives of covers and pages from John Willie's ground breaking digest size fetish magazine, Bizarre published 1946 to 1959. John Willie picked up where Carlo, the illustrator of 1930s Parisian flagellation novels, left off. More about Willie here.










Photo Willie borrowed from London Life magazine (see next post)